Let’s Loop Seattle In New York Times Article

Today, Let’s Loop Seattle is excited to announce that we were mentioned in a New York Times letter to the editor by David Myers, PhD.

Myers’ piece was in response to this article about the struggles of wearing hearing aids. The author explained that when one turns up the volume on her hearing aid in a noisy place, she’s also increasing the volume of all of the background noise. As Dave Myers phrased it, the original article articulated “the difficulty of carving meaning out of noise” for people who wear hearing aids or cochlear implants.

Myers response explains that, there is a way to combat the aforementioned difficulty: hearing loops. Because David Myers (among millions of others across the US) has a telecoil in his hearing aid, “when [he] seek[s] directions at a New York City subway booth, hear[s] a lecture on [his] campus, worship[s] in any of [his] community’s churches… [he] can — with the flip of a switch — turn [his] hearing aids into in-the-ear speakers that broadcast deliciously clear sound.” Of course, this “deliciously clear sound” comes from the hearing loops that are installed in locations throughout the country. By switching his hearing aid to the t-coil setting, clear sound is sent from a microphone, through the loop, into his hearing aid.

Finishing his piece with a list of the various loop movements without the country, Dave Myers makes it clear that no matter where you are, you can advocate for or benefit from loops. Let’s Loop Seattle is thrilled to be included among the list of some of the most successful “Let’s Loop” groups in the country, such as New York City, Michigan, and Arizona. Thanks so much for thinking of us, Dave!

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